NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Morning Edition

When America Needed Them, 'The Waltons' Were There

Corrected on March 27, 2017

A previous Web introduction incorrectly said the show was based on the creator's early life in a tiny town in North Carolina. It should have said Virginia.

All Things Considered

Financial Woes Place Future Of Sears In Doubt

Corrected on March 27, 2017

In this story, we state that the CEO of Sears Holdings said he has serious doubts the company will survive. While we note that this assessment came from the company in its annual report, we incorrectly attribute the statement to the CEO. We should also note that the annual report detailed steps the company is taking to mitigate the risks.

Morning Edition

Former Colleague Says Judge Gorsuch Works Across Party Lines

Corrected on March 22, 2017

After this piece aired, it was brought to our attention that Judge Michael McConnell misremembered the case he mentioned in the interview.

When asked to describe an example of a case where he and Judge Neil Gorsuch disagreed, McConnell mentioned a case involving Denver telecom CEO Joe Nacchio. In fact, Gorsuch had recused himself from that case.

McConnell apologizes for his memory lapse.

All Things Considered

Tomb Of Jesus Is Restored In Jerusalem

Corrected on March 21, 2017

A previous version of this story misspelled Antonia Moropoulou's last name as Moropolou.

Who Has The Healthiest Hearts In The World?

Corrected on March 21, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the amount of extra sugar the average American eats each day. That amount is 22 teaspoons, not 22 tablespoons.

Leading The Charge Against The GOP Health Plan, Rep. Mark Meadows Is Right At Home

Corrected on March 20, 2017

In an earlier version of this story, Park Ridge Health was incorrectly referred to as a Catholic hospital. It is not. It is part of Adventist Health System, a nonprofit Protestant health care system.

A caption in the story also erroneously identified a dam on Lake Sequoyah as Dry Falls. The falls is actually downstream of the dam.

All Things Considered

Judge Gorsuch's Writings Signal He Would Be A Conservative On Social Issues

Corrected on March 20, 2017

In the audio version of this story, we mistakenly report that Mark Rienzi says the notion of complicity is more important than the rights of employees to have health insurance. Rienzi did not say that. Rienzi does believe there are other ways women can get health coverage for birth control outside of their employer's health plans.

How To Make Farmers Love Cover Crops? Pay Them

Corrected on March 18, 2017

An earlier version of this story stated that Ken Staver believes that cover crops pay for themselves. Some proponents of cover crops believe this, but Staver does not think that there's convincing evidence for this, especially for cover crops that are most effective in preventing nutrient pollution.

Weekend Edition Saturday

The Legacy Of The Mississippi Delta Chinese

Corrected on March 18, 2017

In a previous digital version of this story, Frieda Quon's last name was incorrectly spelled as Kwon.

Also, a quote in the digital version, "The Chinese face with a Southern accent throws people off," was misattributed to Quon. It was actually said by Jean Maskas.

All Things Considered

Live-Action 'Beauty And The Beast ' Revisits A Tale As Old As Time

Corrected on March 17, 2017

Bob Mondello says:

"In describing how the first song in the new Beauty and the Beast differs from the animated version, I made a factual error.

"I played a brief bit of dialogue in which Belle encounters a man on the street — Monsieur Jean — who thinks he has lost something, but can't remember what. And then I said, 'That bit's new, and while it's not important [because] this forgetful guy never reappears, it is helpful[.]'

"That's just wrong. Turns out, I'm the forgetful one. Not only does Monsieur Jean reappear, but his being forgetful in this new bit of dialogue is actually setting up a plot thread that is important. It's part of the 'lots of back story' that I later praise the filmmakers for having concocted.

"It's hard to say more without spoilers, and reviewers aren't supposed to say spoilers. We're also not supposed to say things that would cause millions of 6-year-olds to shout at their radios, 'Nooooo, Silly! That's _________.'

"See? No spoilers. At least I got that part right."

This Week In Race: New Doc, New Pols, New Race Game

Corrected on March 17, 2017

A previous version of this story described Ilhan Omar as the first Somali Muslim elected to Congress. She was elected to Minnesota's state House.

Also, a previous version misstated Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's name as Chimanda Adiche Ngozi.

Morning Edition

Leaked Returns Give Insight Into Trump's Taxes

Corrected on March 15, 2017

In a previous version of this story, David Cay Johnston said President Trump would have paid at a 35 percent tax rate if it wasn't for the lingering effects of negative income from a tax shelter and the alternative minimum tax. In fact, the alternative minimum tax prevented Trump from taking as big a deduction as he otherwise would have been able to do.

As Drug Costs Soar, People Delay Or Skip Cancer Treatments

Corrected on March 15, 2017

A previous version of this story said that the highest-dose version of the drug Keytruda cost $1 million a year. That high-dose version was not approved by the FDA. The dosage currently in use costs $152,400 a year.

All Things Considered

Planned Parenthood Would Lose Millions In Payments Under GOP Health Plan

Corrected on March 14, 2017

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly referred to the American Health Care Act as the American Health Insurance Act. Additionally, that version referred to a CBO report estimate that the federal government would reduce its payments for reproductive care to Planned Parenthood by $178 million in 2017 under the proposed bill. According to a Planned Parenthood spokesperson, the organization stands to lose about $400 million in Medicaid reimbursements per year, and the CBO estimate did not fully reflect those reimbursements.

We also previously said in the Web version that the National Institute of Family and Life Advocates was involved in lobbying activities. That organization primarily gives legal advice and other support to faith-based pregnancy centers.

Minority Advocacy Groups Feel Left Out Of National Efforts, Funding

Corrected on March 14, 2017

A previous caption for the second image on this page, using information supplied by Getty Images, incorrectly said the vigil was sponsored by the Council on American-Islamic Relations. The vigil was sponsored by South Asian Americans Leading Together.

States Wrestle With Legalizing Payments For Gestational Surrogates

Corrected on March 10, 2017

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said a state commission in Minnesota recommended that carriers be able to accept payment. The commission didn't come to a conclusion on the issue. It also said the state bill bars compensation. The bill is silent on compensation.

How America's Idea Of Illegal Immigration Doesn't Always Match Reality

Corrected on March 9, 2017

A previous version of the first chart on this page said that there are 32.5 million naturalized citizens in the U.S. There are 19 million, according to the Pew Research Center. (There are 32.5 million lawful immigrants, a number which includes naturalized citizens, green card holders and visa holders.)

Morning Edition

Female Workers Asked To Join In 'A Day Without A Woman' Protests

Corrected on March 8, 2017

In the audio of this story, we say there were more than 1 million demonstrators in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 21. In fact, city officials and researchers have said the crowd size was less than that — perhaps 500,000 to 750,000.

All Things Considered

How Do Americans Feel About The Courts? Let Hollywood Be The Judge

Corrected on March 8, 2017

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly quoted Groucho Marx in Duck Soup as saying "12 years at Leavenworth, or 11 years at Twelveworth." The correct line is: "10 years in Leavenworth or 11 years in Twelveworth."

Morning Edition

Kona Beer's Name Causes Something Of A Brouhaha

Corrected on March 8, 2017

A previous version of the headline stated that despite the name, Kona Brewing isn't in Hawaii. While not all of Kona's beer is brewed in Hawaii, the company notes that its flagship brewhouse is in Kailua-Kona on Hawaii's Big Island.

All Things Considered

New FCC Chairman Moves Quickly To Reverse Obama Policies

Corrected on March 8, 2017

This story says the FCC, led by Chairman Ajit Pai, has dropped efforts to cap rates for prison calls. To clarify: While it is not defending that rate cap for in-state prison calls, it continues to support them for calls between states.

All Things Considered

For Barcelona, Tourism Boom Comes At High Cost

Corrected on March 6, 2017

An earlier Web version of this story said Barcelona Deputy Mayor Janet Sanz estimates there are 10 million licensed, short-term rental flats in the city and about 7 million illegal ones. The correct figures are 10,000 licensed, short-term rental flats and 7,000 illegal ones.

Trump Skips Gridiron Dinner As His Staffers Get Roasted

Corrected on March 5, 2017

A previous version of this story misidentified Elaine Chao as labor secretary. She is the transportation secretary.

Also in a previous version, "The Liberal Old Lady From Academia" was said to be a parody of a Beach Boys hit. While the Beach Boys did record "The Little Old Lady from Pasadena," that song was a hit for Jan & Dean.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sickened Russian Opposition Leader Blames Poison Ordered By Russian Special Services

Corrected on March 4, 2017

An earlier version of the headline for this story stated that Kara-Murza blamed the Kremlin for ordering his poisoning. In fact, as he is quoted as saying in the story, he believes he was poisoned by people who have been or are connected with the Russian special services.

China Describes Its Vision Of Government-Controlled Internet

Corrected on March 2, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the U.S. government officially handed over oversight responsibilities for Internet domains in 2015. In fact, the U.S. government announced the change in 2015 and officially handed over the responsibilities in 2016.

WHO's First-Ever List Of The Dirty Dozen Superbugs

Corrected on March 1, 2017

A previous version of this post stated that a "flu bug" was included in the medium category. The bacteria in question are Haemophilus influenzae, which can cause a wide range of infections, particularly in children, but do not cause flu.

Lawsuit Brings Fresh Scrutiny To Milwaukee's Troubles With Race And Policing

Corrected on March 1, 2017

An earlier version of this story said that Nusrat Choudhury, a lawyer for the ACLU, said that police records show that few police stops ended in frisks. In fact, Choudhury said that few police records the ACLU examined indicate whether a frisk occurred following a police stop, much less whether there was any basis for a frisk.

Morning Edition

With Republicans In Charge, Democrats Plan To Redefine Their Mission

Corrected on February 28, 2017

An earlier version of this Web story incorrectly identified the seats picked up in the Kansas state Legislature as moderate Republicans, not Democrats. Also, during the conversation, DNC Chair Tom Perez said Democrats netted 14 seats in the Kansas Legislature. In fact, the correct number is 12.

All Things Considered

Week In Politics: Trump's Speech At CPAC, Race For DNC Chair

Corrected on February 27, 2017

David Brooks notes that some CPAC attendees were waving Russian flags. That did happen. But it should not be inferred that those people were expressing support for Russia or its president, Vladimir Putin. The flags were distributed by political pranksters, and many were confiscated by CPAC staff.

Morning Edition

How The Media Are Using Encryption Tools To Collect Anonymous Tips

Corrected on February 27, 2017

A previous Web version of this story quoted Trevor Timm as saying a record number of journalists had been prosecuted over the past eight to 10 years. Timm subsequently informed us that he had misspoken and had meant to say a record number of sources.

When You Love An Old Dog, Managing Care Can Be A Challenge

Corrected on February 25, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly suggested some dogs may be able to take ibuprofen. Dogs should not be given pain medication made for humans. Canine-specific pain medication can be given with the supervision of a veterinarian.

All Things Considered

Landowners Likely To Bring More Lawsuits As Trump Moves On Border Wall

Corrected on February 24, 2017

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say Eloisa Tamez is a professor at the University of Texas, Brownsville. She is actually at the University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley.

Morning Edition

White House Orders The Hiring Of 15,000 New Immigration Agents

Corrected on February 22, 2017

A previous headline on this story said the White House ordered the hiring of 15,000 new border agents. The order is for the hiring of 5,000 new Border Patrol agents and 10,000 new Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, who work in the interior of the country.

Morning Edition

Muslim Brotherhood, Mainstream In Many Countries, May Be Listed As Terrorist Group

Corrected on February 22, 2017

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Egyptians elected a Muslim Brotherhood president six years after the fall of Hosni Mubarak. The election took place in 2012, a year after Mubarak's fall. The audio version of the story incorrectly states that the 2012 election took place six years ago; it has been five years.

The Other WWII American-Internment Atrocity

Corrected on February 22, 2017

An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that President Reagan had signed the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians Act in 1980. He actually signed it in 1988.

Crop-Protecting Fungicides May Be Hurting The Honey Bees

Corrected on February 22, 2017

An earlier version of this story didn't accurately depict the degree of regulation imposed on fungicides in many states, including Washington. In Washington and many other states, fungicides are not addressed by pollinator protection guidelines, which focus on other types of pesticides.

Record Number Of Miles Driven In U.S. Last Year

Corrected on February 21, 2017

A previous version of this story referred to the gas tax having remained at 18.4 percent a gallon since 1993. The story now makes clear that figure refers to the federal gas tax.

Can Changing When And What We Eat Help Outwit Disease?

Corrected on February 21, 2017

A previous version of this article incorrectly referred to irritable bowel syndrome as an autoimmune disease. The correct term is inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's.

A previous photo caption associated with this story that appeared on the NPR.org home page incorrectly spelled Brandie Jefferson's first name as Brandi.

Trump's Thursday Press Conference, Annotated

Corrected on February 17, 2017

A previous version of an annotation about businesses investing in the U.S. said Ford decided to invest $700 billion to expand its Michigan plant. It actually decided to invest $700 million.

'A Day Without Immigrants' Promises A National Strike Thursday

Corrected on February 16, 2017

In an earlier version of this story, reporter Danielle Karson cited LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis saying immigrants contributed $300 billion a year in tax revenue, rather than to the GDP of L.A. County. We've clarified that point in the quote from Karson's report.

Does Science Know Right From Wrong?

Corrected on February 16, 2017

An earlier version of this 13.7 post stated that Vannevar Bush's July 1945 report went to President Roosevelt. While the report had been requested by Roosevelt in 1944, it wasn't finished until after his death, so it went to President Truman.

5 Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News

Corrected on February 16, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly identified the school where Todd Flory teaches. It is Wheatland Elementary School in Wichita, Kan., not Calamus Wheatland Elementary School in Calamus, Iowa.

All Things Considered

Rollout Of Chevy Bolt May Mark Turning Point For Electric Car Market

Corrected on February 14, 2017

In the radio version of this story, we describe the Chevy Volt as a plug-in hybrid car that can run on gas when the battery is empty. To be more precise, when the battery is low on electric charge, the Volt switches to a gas-powered generator for the battery.

Morning Edition

Stonewall Riots Grab The Spotlight From Black Cat Protests

Corrected on February 13, 2017

In this story, as in a previous Web introduction, we say that the 1967 protest at the Black Cat tavern in Los Angeles was the country's first organized LGBT demonstration. In fact, there had been earlier protests in the U.S., including the first "Annual Reminder" demonstration in Philadelphia in 1965.

Did Betsy DeVos Make You Want To Run For School Board?

Corrected on February 12, 2017

An earlier version of this story, and the headline, implied that Victoria Sterling is running for school board in Jefferson City, Mo., because of the national controversy over Betsy DeVos. Sterling says that it was concerns about local education issues that inspired her candidacy.

Can We Trust Science?

Corrected on February 12, 2017

An earlier version of this post incorrectly stated that Walter Freeman won the Nobel Prize. It was Freeman's mentor, Egas Moniz, who won the prize.

Morning Edition

Broadcasting Board of Governors' Chief On The Future Of VOA

Corrected on February 10, 2017

A previous Web version of this story called John Lansing the Voice of America chief. Lansing is the head of the Broadcasting Board of Governors. It also called the group a governing body. It is an independent agency.

Morning Edition

A Romance That Began With A Mistake

Corrected on February 10, 2017

A previous Web version of this story said the Dewanes were married after about three months of dating. They were engaged after about three months.

How Betsy DeVos Became Trump's Least Popular Cabinet Pick

Corrected on February 3, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the Broad Foundation had taken a position against Betsy DeVos. Because of its tax-exempt status, the foundation cannot engage in political activity.

Morning Edition

Threat Of Rain Doesn't Deter Crowds From National Mall

Corrected on February 2, 2017

A previous Web introduction to this story misspelled Audie Cornish's first name as Audio. Additionally, a previous version of the transcript misspelled Cory Turner's first name as Corey.

Fresh Air

Writer Bharati Mukherjee

Corrected on February 1, 2017

A previous headline and story misspelled Bharati Mukherjee's name as Bharti.

Morning Edition

Trump's Immigration Order Is 'Un-American,' Rep. Carson Says

Corrected on January 31, 2017

Following the broadcast of this report, Carson's office sent NPR the following statement about his comment regarding racial supremacist groups:

"This assertion was not based on a single statistic or on relative terror threat, but rather an assessment of the current environment. The congressman believes that when looking at relative membership numbers, hateful rhetoric, racially based hate crimes, and fatalities by right-wing organizations, it paints a picture of a larger threat to the safety of Americans and society as a whole. New America has an assessment of deaths from far right wing vs. violent jihadist terrorism. The FBI reported that in 2014, 47% of hate crimes were racially motivated. And the white supremacist group Stormfront has claimed additional interest in their content on the back of Donald Trump's recent comments. Additionally, it is important to remember that many attacks are inspired by an ideology rather than directed by an organization. Just as [the Islamic State] bears responsibility for lone wolf attacks in the United States, so do racial supremacist groups who inspire hate crimes. Taken together, he believes it is reasonable to say that the racial supremacist groups pose a more significant threat."

Trump Set To Announce Supreme Court Nominee

Corrected on January 31, 2017

In a previous version of this story, we said Judge Pryor sits on a federal appeals court based in New Orleans. In fact, Judge Pryor's court is based in Atlanta.

All Things Considered

Attention Must Be Paid To What 'The Salesman' Is Selling

Corrected on January 31, 2017

The scene depicted in the photograph is from the movie The Salesman. A previous caption incorrectly referred to a different Asghar Farhadi movie, A Separation.

Morning Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

Corrected on January 29, 2017

Work on the project was done at the University of California, San Diego and not the University of California, Davis as was previously stated in this story. Additionally, Joseph Wang is the chair of nanoengineering at UCSD, not UC Davis.

The Trump Foreign Policy Doctrine — In 3 Points

Corrected on January 26, 2017

A chart showing military spending by NATO countries has been removed from this page because of inaccuracies in the figures given for many of those nations. Data on the defense spending of NATO countries are available here.

Fact Check: Has President Obama 'Depleted' The Military?

Corrected on January 26, 2017

A chart showing military spending by NATO countries has been removed from this page because of inaccuracies in the figures given for many of those nations. Data on the defense spending of NATO countries are available here.

'Like High-Definition From The Heavens'; NOAA Releases New Images Of Earth

Corrected on January 24, 2017

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the GOES-16 is named, in part, after its imaging device, which measures 16 spectral bands. In fact, it is the 16th in a series of NOAA satellites.

In addition, the story said the GOES-16 launched in December 2016. It launched in November of that year.

Morning Edition

Southern Border Wall: Campaign Slogan Meets Reality

Corrected on January 24, 2017

In the audio, the following quote should have been attributed to Border Patrol spokesman Joshua Devack, not agent James Nielsen: "At the time that this fence was built, it was too expensive to continue. And there's also this natural barrier here that a lot of crossers choose not to climb this mountain. They prefer to have easier access to roads and civilization."

Trump Signs Executive Order To 'Ease The Burdens Of Obamacare'

Corrected on January 20, 2017

A previous version of this story implied that the bust of Martin Luther King Jr. had been removed from the Oval Office. It turns out that the bust is still there and had just been obscured from the sight of the pool reporter by a door and an agent.

Ask Me Another

Eugene Mirman: Burger On A Sesame Seed Pun

Corrected on January 20, 2017

During Eugene Mirman's quiz, the city of Johannesburg was incorrectly identified as one of South Africa's three capitals, alongside Pretoria and Cape Town. The judicial capital of South Africa is Bloemfontein.

Scientists Needn't Get A Patient's Consent To Study Blood Or DNA

Corrected on January 19, 2017

An earlier version of this story suggested that the revised Common Rule will allow multi-institution studies on humans to be governed by a single, central oversight committee. In fact, the revised rule requires such studies to rely on a central oversight committee, with certain exceptions. Also, to clarify, the Common Rule applies to federally funded research on human subjects, not just federally funded medical research.

All Things Considered

Deferred Action: A Bird In Hand For Young Immigrants

Corrected on January 19, 2017

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly describe the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program as resulting from an executive order. It was actually created through executive action.

All Things Considered

Some North Carolinians Expect A Struggle Under Trump Administration

Corrected on January 17, 2017

In this story, we say Donald Trump received 85 percent of the vote in North Carolina's Yadkin County. That was a preliminary estimate. In fact, Trump received 78.8 percent of the vote in Yadkin County, which was a tie with Graham County for the highest vote percentage in the state.

All Things Considered

How A Grieving Father Created The Model For Anti-Terror Lawsuits

Corrected on January 13, 2017

A previous version of the transcript included a typographical error. Iran did not make a down payment for weapons of about $400 billion. The down payment was about $400 million. The figure is correct in the audio.

Morning Edition

New Ghanaian President's Speech Sounds Familiar

Corrected on January 10, 2017

A previous version of this story, including the headline, incorrectly said that the communications director for Ghana's president had been fired from his job.

Morning Edition

Trump Business Deals In Southeast Asia Raise Conflict Of Interest Concerns

Corrected on January 6, 2017

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that Indonesian politician Setya Novanto was a business partner of President-elect Donald Trump. In fact it was Trump's Indonesian business partner who arranged for Novanto and Trump to meet.

Morning Edition

Gun Deaths In Chicago Reach Startling Number As Year Closes

Corrected on January 6, 2017

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Laquan McDonald was unarmed. In fact, he was carrying a knife.

Previously posted Dec. 28, 2016: A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that in September Chicago had surpassed last year's total of about 740 killings. The correct number is 470.

All Things Considered

When Tech Workers Arrive On Visa, What About Their Spouses?

Corrected on January 6, 2017

A previous caption incorrectly named the organization Child Rights and You as Children's Rights and You. It also incorrectly described CRY as an Indian organization. While CRY does conduct child development projects in India, it also does the same in the U.S. and is based in Braintree, Mass.

Merry Prankster In LA Wants To Start 2017 On A High Note

Corrected on January 3, 2017

A previous version of this story referred to California's Proposition 64 as legalizing recreational use of marijuana beginning in 2018. In fact, recreational use became legal when voters approved the measure in November; the state has until Jan. 1, 2018, to begin issuing licenses to sell marijuana.